A Pragmatic Introduction to Secure Multi-Party Computation

A Pragmatic Introduction to
Secure Multi-Party Computation

David Evans, Vladimir Kolesnikov and Mike Rosulek

Secure multi-party computation (MPC) has evolved from a theoretical curiosity in the 1980s to a tool for building real systems today. Over the past decade, MPC has been one of the most active research areas in both theoretical and applied cryptography. This book introduces several important MPC protocols, and surveys methods for improving the efficiency of privacy-preserving applications built using MPC. Besides giving a broad overview of the field and the insights of the main constructions, we overview the most currently active areas of MPC research and aim to give readers insights into what problems are practically solvable using MPC today and how different threat models and assumptions impact the practicality of different approaches.

Full Text: [PDF]

NOW Publishers, December 2018: Publishers Page

Contents

1 Introduction [PDF]
1.1 Outsourced Computation
1.2 Multi-Party Computation
1.3 MPC Applications
1.4 Overview
2 Defining Multi-Party Computation [PDF]
2.1 Notations and Conventions
2.2 Basic Primitives
2.3 Security of Multi-Party Computation
2.4 Specific Functionalities of Interest
2.5 Further Reading
3 Fundamental MPC Protocols [PDF]
3.1 Yao's Garbled Circuits Protocol
3.2 Goldreich-Micali-Wigderson (GMW) Protocol
3.3 BGW protocol
3.4 MPC From Preprocessed Multiplication Triples
3.5 Constant-Round Multi-Party Computation: BMR
3.6 Information-Theoretic Garbled Circuits
3.7 Oblivious Transfer
3.8 Custom Protocols
3.9 Further Reading
4 Implementation Techniques [PDF]
4.1 Less Expensive Garbling
4.2 Optimizing Circuits
4.3 Protocol Execution
4.4 Programming Tools
4.5 Further Reading
5 Oblivious Data Structures [PDF]
5.1 Tailored Oblivious Data Structures
5.2 RAM-Based MPC
5.3 Tree-Based RAM-MPC
5.4 Square-Root RAM-MPC
5.5 Floram
5.6 Further Reading
6 Malicious Security [PDF]
6.1 Cut-and-Choose
6.2 Input Recovery Technique
6.3 Batched Cut-and-Choose
6.4 Gate-level Cut-and-Choose: LEGO
6.5 Zero-Knowledge Proofs
6.6 Authenticated Secret Sharing: BDOZ and SPDZ
6.7 Authenticated Garbling
6.8 Further Reading
7 Alternative Threat Models [PDF]
7.1 Honest Majority
7.2 Asymmetric Trust
7.3 Covert Security
7.4 Publicly Verifiable Covert (PVC) Security
7.5 Reducing Communication in Cut-and-Choose Protocols
7.6 Trading Off Leakage for Efficiency
7.7 Further Reading
8 Conclusion [PDF]
References [PDF]
More Reading
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